Tag Archives: embrace life

Some People Say…

…2020 was the lost year.

I disagree

2020 was the year… 

I became focused

I got serious about my writing

Enjoyed contact with writers from around the world

Was challenged and encouraged

To be bold

To let the words out

To trust my voice

Learned the peace of spending time with my thoughts

Found joy in simple pleasures

Around my house

With my husband

Enjoyed time to read

And then read some more

Cooked some amazing meals

Wrote, and wrote and wrote some more

Became comfortable with Zoom and its limitations

Met other creatives who were open about their struggles during this time

Up rooted myself

Moved

Settled in to find myself surrounded by unknown plants

Doors opened to new learning 

Writing continues

Meeting neighbors and others

Continue Zoom meetings with writers

Projects progressing…

2020 was the year that continues in 2021!

Amazing Agave or Dr. Seuss Tree

Spring is in the air…

Lantana Surrounded by Alyssum

It’s February

Yet spring abounds

The birds are busy

Calling from one to another

We watch them building nests

Or scavenging in the garden

Buried plants have broken the earth’s crust

Then released their blooms

With these blooms, comes color

Fragrances fill the air

Sweet alyssum flows down the hillside

While the aroma wafts back to the patio

Citrus trees share their harvest

While setting blossoms for next year’s crop

It’s all part of the cycle

The invigorating cycle of life

It feels so good to be in the middle of this

All in a morning walk…

A morning in Ireland…

I’m captivated by the sheep dotting the countryside. Once out of town, in County Kerry, Ireland you’ll find many sheep. When we first arrived the little ones appeared quite fresh and so tiny. As we drive around I’ve noticed how much they have grown.

We left early, on our way to a bible study this week. The crisp morning air allowed us to see wide vistas. We drove along the coast and appreciated the view. We came to a spot that overlooks fields in the valley with the mountains in the background. Stopping on the narrow, twisty country roads is usually not an option. Yet we happened upon a driveway on our side of the road with a low gate on the opposite. We parked, got out, expected to take a couple photos and continue to the study.

I wasn’t prepared for what we encountered. The view was beautiful as expected, but sheep filled the field. As we stood at the fence enjoying the expanse before us, they bleated and moved towards us. This put me closer to the sheep of Ireland than I’ve been before. This was a special morning gift.

… and was a blessed start to the day.

 

 

An Interesting Dilemma to Ponder…

I recently read an article from the Washington Post about millennials who nix their parents’ treasures. I can see aspects of this story from both sides.

Several years ago, my husband and I performed a major downsizing effort to move west. It was an interesting experience. We have a large gaggle of adult children. Of things we wanted to find new homes for, some of the kids took a few things. We were surprised at several large family pieces we had no takers for. We sold those pieces of furniture, as they were not going to fit in our new life. It was a bittersweet revelation to us. Sad the heritage of the pieces won’t be maintained. Proud our kids could make those decisions and not take the pieces they didn’t want or couldn’t use just because they thought it would please us.

For us, or at least me, the downsizing project proved to be unbelievably liberating. We kept things with the most meaning to us, and things that would fit in our new home. It’s been good for me to travel lighter and have fewer things. Others who have gone through a similar process also talk about the freedom, which comes from shedding stuff. Perhaps the younger generation has it right. Hold onto things lightly and embrace life.

Yet I wonder if they may someday recognize the loss of some of the things they’ve passed on. We do genealogy research, so we have many photos, scrapbooks and family historical information. I have framed my great-grandfather’s original citizenship paperwork. There is only one original. I hope it will have value to someone in the family, as it is part of our roots as Americans. But I don’t know.

I’m sensory. I enjoy visual pleasures from art and photography; the fragrances of food cooking, flowers blooming or even autumn in the morning air stir me to life; the sounds of wind blowing through the tree leaves adds another dimension to the meaning of autumn for me; holding a book and actually turning the pages is part of the story coming to life; enjoying an old piece of furniture or dishes I remember seeing my grandmother use takes me back in time to her kitchen. Can one savor all those emotions without some of the things from those times?

For clarification – I do believe embracing life and all it has to offer is of far higher value than clamoring after ‘things’.

I look forward to some fun discussion. I don’t think there are any ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ answers, just different perspectives on this topic. Now for the questions:

1. As the parents, we aren’t ready to part with all those things yet, so how do we discern which things those kids might want later?

2. If you don’t want things, what method do you use to save memories for later enjoyment?

3. Are things of historical value important to you? Why? or why not?

4. How do you embrace life?

Have a great day — and enjoy life!