Tag Archives: nature

Timber…

The end has arrived. It was time to purge the agave before it became rigid and too tough to cut. The blooms hosted bees, honey birds and some butterflies. 

Timber…

When the stalk fell, a mild sweet fragrance filled the air.

Pieces cut to fit the green waste mounded on the ground. 

Then each was stabbed with a pitch fork and dropped in the bin. 

Smaller pieces were scooped in. 

Few pieces wait for next week’s trash collection day.

July 27 — Close up

Check out the close-up bloom. Each of those tiny tennacles were feeding zones for all the flying critters that hovered around the blooms once they opened. After sitting in the sun for several days, there was no fragrance, and no visiting creatures. This piece will join its kin in the bin next week.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this marvel of nature with me. 

We’ve yet to determine what will be planted in the agave’s former location. But the next selection will take into consideration the little bridge and mature size of the plant.

Patience…

Close-up blooms July 21

Obviously, I lacked patience when I wrote my last post

The blooms are breaking forth

Hummingbirds and bees swarm the yellow flowers

The green leaves shriveling and giving up their life blood

Soon the flowers will produce seeds as the plant withers and dies

My front row seat to this miracle of nature has fascinated me

Our blue agave bloom process took longer than my research suggested

The show has been fun

I’ve enjoyed sharing it with you

Gardner friends have encouraged we start to cut back the leaves

As their nourishment drains, the outer skin will shrivel and harden

As they say, 

July 21 — partial blooms

…the curtain closes on this performance

Where are the blooms?

Still no flowers

We’re nearing the end

The long spikey leaves are shriveling

Starting first at the base

The tall bloom spike has branched

Buds reach tall from the branches

No yellow flowers

Not yet

New plant sprouting at base

Advice to us

Cut the leaves before they dry

Or the work is much harder

The location is too prominent 

Don’t allow the dead plant to remain there

Yet no flowers

For now, the stalk remains

Each week, some of the leaves will be removed

Thanks for watching this amazing transition with me. It’s not over yet, but we’re getting closer to the end. I expected the flowers to bloom before the death cycle became evident. So, future photos will have fewer leaves on the bottom, and perhaps there will be yellow flowers. Or not…

Bougainvillea

Bougainvillea plants explode with color

Petals are thin

Each bloom holds four to six petals tightly together 

Two white dots fill the center of each as identifying marks for the species

Some tower to the sky growing against the house

Others fill large areas of the garden

Whichever, they fill their space with color and gaiety

Colors vary depending upon plant

The blossoms dry then flutter to the ground

They swirl in the air, ultimately landing below

Like tissue paper scattered and left after a celebration

Tissue Blooms

The yard represents life

Family visited for two weeks

House filled with laughter

Children played games, ran in the garden

Shared cooking experiences

A glass of wine enjoyed in the evenings

Tomorrow’s adventures planned

Car loaded

Family departed

Time flies

Memories are left scattered around

Different shades and hews

Much like my bougainvillea tissue flowers

Blossoms, like memories scattered everywhere

Stay Tuned…

Change is coming. Last week I thought this plant looked different. Then decided, maybe not. By Saturday, I knew a bloom was coming. The gardener remembers planting this agave 30 years ago.

April 17th

I’ve heard the bloom growth is phenomenally fast. The following displays what can happen in only two days.

April 19th

Besides growing fast, the blooms are supposed to be spectacular. Expect periodic photo updates.

It will be fun to watch, and a wee bit bittersweet. With the bloom, comes death. It will be sad to loose this plant as it is a showcase specimen on the pathway to a patio area. Perhaps it’ll spawn another.

I Love Living Here…

Frequently, I’m asked how I’m enjoying my new home.

My response flows.

“I’m loving it more every day.”

They come in all shapes and sizes
New Cacti & Succulent Bed

Perhaps I’m under the influence of the intoxicating fragrances that waft through the air. Depending upon where I stand on the property today, I might smell orange blossoms, or alyssum, or eucalyptus, or other yet to be identified scents. Each offers aromas I enjoy, and I savor those moments of fragrance.

Regularly, I’m learning something new about the plantings on the property. The former owners enjoyed the diversity found in this locale, so there’s a variety of mature plantings to enjoy. Our styles may be different, but our love of plants and being outdoors to enjoy them is something we share with those owners. We’re grateful they invested in the property. We’ve relocated and moved some things to create different spaces or zones; this visually opened the approach to the house; yet maintained almost all the species we worked with. It’s a process and we’re comfortable knowing that it will all take time. I wake up, look outdoors and say,

“I love living here.”

Spring is in the air…

Lantana Surrounded by Alyssum

It’s February

Yet spring abounds

The birds are busy

Calling from one to another

We watch them building nests

Or scavenging in the garden

Buried plants have broken the earth’s crust

Then released their blooms

With these blooms, comes color

Fragrances fill the air

Sweet alyssum flows down the hillside

While the aroma wafts back to the patio

Citrus trees share their harvest

While setting blossoms for next year’s crop

It’s all part of the cycle

The invigorating cycle of life

It feels so good to be in the middle of this

All in a morning walk…