Tag Archives: transition

Home and Writing Routines…

I’ve been back in Colorado about a month now. After a few days, I adjusted to the time differences, the altitude, the night stars and different lifestyles. Remaining were the routine things around the house that needed attention, civic responsibilities and reconnecting with friends on this side of the Atlantic. It looks like it might take us the rest of the year to connect with family and friends we haven’t seen in a while.

While in Ireland, I established a “more” regular writing routine than I had previously practiced. For me, that meant at least three or four dedicated times of writing, or writing related activities per week. It seems like I fell out of step with those practices quickly after landing back in the states. My first goal is to return my Irish writing routine.

Writing Location

I’m okay with you checking in to see my progress. That’s accountability.

 

Bittersweet…

The tulips are gone. The weather turned a corner and I shed my daily sweater layer. We witnessed community clean-up days; people pruned their shrubs, bushes and trees; or painted their house fronts. The sound of birds fills the air, the trees are greening, roses fill walkways, everything is in bloom or soon ready to break forth. Tour bus traffic has increased on the roads since when we first arrived. Ireland has readied itself for the tourist season, just as we prepared to pack up and leave. It is a different place than when we arrived.

We’ve enjoyed two months in County Kerry, and enjoyed the people we’ve met, gotten to know and hope to maintain relationships with.

The current stage is of goodbyes with the question, “when will we see you again?” The answer is in God’s hands.

Friends from home are asking, when you return?

Life activities on both sides of the Atlantic are calling.

Goodbyes are never easy as they pull on heart strings.

We leave with many memories.

A piece of my heart remains here and a piece of my heart is calling me home.

If you were to ask what my thoughts are, Bittersweet is the answer.

 

Second Half

I recently finished reading “The Second Half of your Life” by Jill Shaw Ruddock.

I resonate with the term “Second Half” instead of “old” or “retired.”

This book covers much information I’ve previously read, available to the woman who reaches those menopausal years, yet Jill Ruddock nicely pulled it all together in one place. Being an American, I enjoyed reading perspectives from “the other side of the pond,” even though I’m currently “on that side.” The core issues remain the same.

I enjoyed the humor found in the different use of vocabulary.

I appreciated her reference to those of us who are “baby boomers” being the “golden generation.” She stated we have defined every age of our lives simply because of how many of us there are; and expects as a group we will redefine what “old” means.

Enjoying my Second Half
Cold, windy day at Dingle Bay

I like that thought. I have no interest in the idea of trying to be younger than my current age, but certainly won’t sit down and wait to die. This is my “second life” and I’m enjoying life. For me, that means life is to be lived; to be creative; to be full of passion and meaning.

Last week I spent a morning with a group of women trying to get a Women’s Resource Center off the ground here in Tralee, Ireland. The room was filled with energy while women shared their vision and passion to create something in the community to benefit many. Some of these women were in their “second half” living a passionate life.

 

What’s your current passion?

 

Learning and Limos…..

It was my last day at work. I had looked forward to this day with anticipation, yet it did not feel ‘real’ to me. A delicious cake had been baked in honor of this, my last day. There were meetings with both my immediate department co-workers and peers from other areas on campus. Everyone was pleasant, gracious and offered genuine good wishes for my future. My plans were to be picked up from work; go home and finish packing up the kitchen; doctor’s appointment in the morning; spend the night with friends; and the next morning head out on our cross-country move. Even with all those plans, it still felt like ‘just another day’ and I could not understand why! At the end of the day Tom arrived to help me carry things out of my office. Our car was nowhere to be seen. Instead he directed me to where a limo was parked. I was shocked. Tom reminded me I previously said, “I’ve never ridden in a limo.” I was a little surprised, but figured we would just take a limo ride. After the door opened and a car full of my friends yelled “SURPRISE” I was speechless. Even thinking of that afternoon leaves my eyes moist. It was an amazing time! We shared great appetizers from the Black Sheep restaurant with Champaign, stories, laughter and memories. My retirement felt ‘real’ for the first time in the limo with my friends. …and we made even more memories together. Every one was returned to their car. We went home and I completed packing up the kitchen. The limo ride with friends created a wonderful transitional highlight to mark the beginning of my retirement. That ride celebrating with friends made my retirement ‘real’ to me. That afternoon ride also taught me the truth about limos. Riding in a limo is not the big deal nor is just for important people; it is who you ride in the limo with and what you share that make it a big deal! Now when I see a limo, I wonder what and how the people inside are celebrating. It is friends who make life ‘real’! To my friends – again, thank you for the memories!

The Gang